garden closeup in Amherst NY

What does climate change mean for Buffalo-area gardeners?

by Mike Van Der Puy Climate change is here. What does that mean for gardeners and farmers in Western New York? Should we alter our growing plans? If so, how? Evidence that the climate is changing in Western New York You may have noticed migratory birds arriving earlier than they used to or see some bushes budding in January. Those are clues that the Western New York climate is slowly changing. However, we have more than anecdotal evidence that climate…

spring buds and rock in snow in Buffalo

No early spring: Buffalo gardens will have to wait for warm weather

by Connie Oswald Stofko Last year at this time, spring had already arrived in the Buffalo area. The ground was thawed, the sun was shining, the air was warm and I was in my garden getting a head start on pulling weeds. It was glorious! Will we be getting another early spring this year? Probably not. “Last year was an aberration,” said Tom Paone, meterologist with the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Buffalo. We keep getting snow this month,…

watering garden in Western New York

With Western New York’s dry weather, measure your watering by the inch

Because we’ve had a few showers lately, Western New Yorkers think their gardens have gotten enough rain. Unfortunately, “Our gardens are actually facing near drought conditions,” said Ken Re, who is in sales and is the director of marketing for Russell’s Tree and Shrub Farm in East Amherst. “In this dry weather you should be watering regularly–-every other day if you can,” he said. “If you don’t water enough, your plants are placed under stress but may not show the…