Volunteers needed for cleanup day at Kenneglenn Nature Preserve

Date/Time
Date(s) - Wednesday, Aug 06, 2014
1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Location
Kenneglenn Nature Preserve

Categories


The Western New York Land Conservancy is looking for volunteers for a summer cleanup day from 1 to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 6  at Kenneglenn Nature Preserve near East Aurora.

Andrea Locke, the coordinator for the Western New York Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (WNY PRISM), will help start the afternoon off with a talk about invasive species in our region and what you can do to help.

At Kenneglenn, the gardens need weeding, the hedges need pruning, the screen doors on the office porch need mending, and a few cedar shingles on the walls need replacing.

The Land Conservancy also needs some tools to help with the work (square-edged shovels, loppers, gloves).

If you would like to help and/or can let the Land Conservancy borrow some tools, please contact the Land Conservancy at (716) 687-1225 or info@wnylc.org. The Land Conservancy asks that all volunteers sign up in advance.

Refreshments will be provided. Directions to the Kenneglenn Nature Preserve will be given when you register. (Kenneglenn is located just north of Hunters Creek County Park at the intersection of routes 20A and 78 in the Town of Wales. The driveway is located off of Old Strykersville Road. This is a long single lane drive with two-way traffic. Please note that the trail system is not well marked, so Kenneglenn can only be accessed by appointment with the Land Conservancy.)

The Western New York Land Conservancyis a regional, not-for-profit land trust that permanently protects land with significant conservation value in Western New York for future generations. The Land Conservancy envisions a future in which open spaces, working lands, wildlife habitat and scenic beauty are cherished and protected as part of the landscape and character of Western New York. The Land Conservancy is one of 1,700 land trusts nationwide, including 90 in New York State. Land trusts have protected 40 million acres over the last 20 years.