spotted lanternfly nymphs courtesy Brian Eshenaur

Watch for spotted lanternfly in WNY; one found in West Seneca

by Connie Oswald Stofko The bad news is that a spotted lanternfly (SLF), an invasive insect, was reported last week in West Seneca. The good news is that the specimen that was found was dead. More good news is that Western New York probably doesn’t have an established spotted lanternfly population yet. There are two things that point to that conclusion. First, the specimen that was found was an adult, and it’s too early in the year to find an…

adult spotted lanternfly

Spotted lanternfly is in NYS; learn how to track this invasive pest

Gardeners and other residents are asked to look out for the spotted lanternfly (SLF), an invasive pest that poses a severe threat to our landscape trees–and to forest and agriculture as well. There’s bad news and good news. The bad news is that the SLF has been spotted in several locations in New York State. The good news is that it hasn’t spread to much of the state. Learn how to help in these online events: Monday, June 7 at 1…

adult spotted lanternfly

Spotted lanternfly (SLF) can damage plants & keep you inside; please report sightings

  Please be on the lookout for an invasive insect called the spotted lanternfly (SLF). Not only can it damage many kinds of plants, it can secrete so much messy “honeydew” that people can’t go outside without getting honeydew on their hair and clothes, according to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). The SLF was first found in Pennsylvania in 2014. A single, dead SLF adult was found in New York this past autumn. The SLF  is an invasive pest from…

adult spotted lanternflies

Save the grapes & other crops from spotted lanternflies in WNY

by Connie Oswald Stofko I hope you’ve been keeping your eyes open for the invasive spotted lanternfly. In July, a spotted lanternfly was found in West Seneca, but it was dead. Then in September, more than 100 live spotted lanternflies were found in Buffalo. Not only can it damage garden plants, the spotted lanternfly (SLF) can wreak havoc on vineyards. “SLF can have a devastating impact on vineyards, as we’ve seen in neighboring states, so we need everyone’s help to…

Spotted lanternfly egg masses

Report egg masses that might be spotted lantern fly in WNY

by Connie Oswald Stofko Now is the time to watch for and report egg masses of the spotted lanternfly (SLF). It’s an invasive pest from Asia that feeds on a variety of plants including grapes, hops and maple trees, posing a severe threat to New York forests and agriculture. You can volunteer with NY iMapInvasives to look for SLF and its preferred host plant, tree-of-heaven, which is also an invasive species. Controlling infestations of the tree can help stop the spread…

holly raguza, Bugwood.org

Good news: No lanternfly infestations found, but your help is still needed

The good news is that there hasn’t yet been a documented spotted lanternfly infestation in New York. That’s wonderful because the spotted lanternfly can damage many kinds of plants. In addition, it can secrete so much messy “honeydew” that people can’t go outside without getting honeydew on their hair and clothes. If this insect becomes established in New York, it could impact our forests, agriculture and tourism. Your help is needed to keep this invasive and destructive insect out of our area, according…

holly raguza, Bugwood.org

Spotted lanternflies found in NYS; look for egg masses

by Connie Oswald Stofko Back in May, we told you about the spotted lanternfly (SLF), a new invasive insect that can damage many plants and can secrete so much messy “honeydew” that people can’t go outside without getting honeydew on their hair and clothes. In September and October, both dead and live SLF have been found in New York State. Autumn is the time that the SLF lays eggs, so look for egg masses as well as adults. Updates on SLF found…

poster for video Uninvited: The Spread of Invasives Species

Dogs, drones & more: Video on dealing with invasive species in WNY

by Connie Oswald Stofko Yes, invasives species are causing problems for us in our everyday lives. And more invasive species will probably arrive in Western New York. But there are things we can do. That’s the upbeat message of the video Uninvited: The Spread of Invasive Species, produced by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation with West Field Production Co. Invasive species we have been dealing with in Western New York, such as the emerald ash borer that…

insects in colored squares

‘What’s Bugging You’ series addresses pest problems

Find out not only how to get rid of pests, but why the pests are there in the first place with What’s Bugging You First Fridays. Get practical advice in this new virtual series. Learn how to use integrated pest management (IPM), a wholistic approach that uses different tools and practices to avoid pest problems, deal with pest problems and promote a healthy environment. The series is being held by Cornell Cooperative Extension Chautauqua County in partnership with the New…

birch bark

Find better alternatives to silver birch in WNY Gardening Matters

People love the beauty of silver birch trees (Betula pendula) but have realized that variety is short lived and susceptible to the birch borer. Find other native alternatives that are more interesting in this article by Lyn Chimera. It’s in the current issue of WNY Gardening Matters, produced by the Master Gardeners of Cornell Cooperative Extension in Erie County. “Remember, if you want to plant a tree always check for an appropriate native first,” Chimera said. Other articles in this…