Grow rose bush from wedding bouquet– or use any roses you get from the florist

David Clark propagate rose from wedding bouquetby Connie Oswald Stofko

A reader came across the story we did awhile back on starting plants from cuttings and left a question in the comments section.

“How do I root roses from the florist?” asked Tina Strength. “How do I start them rooting and growing?”

This question intrigued me. It never even occurred to me that you might be able to grow a plant from a rose you get in a bouquet from the florist.

I turned to David Clark, the local horticulturist who teaches the series of horticulture class at the Buffalo and Erie County Botanical Gardens. He says that yes, you can indeed start a plant from a cut rose, and he shows us how to do that in this video.

This is such a cool idea! It would be so romantic to have a piece of your wedding bouquet or other special roses growing year after year in your yard. This would also be a fun way to propagate rose plants that no one else in your neighborhood has.

In the video below, Clark shows us step by step how to propagate a rose you get from the florist.

He points out that the plant that results from this propagation technique will be an own-root rose. He explains how that compares to the grafted roses that we usually grow in our gardens in Western New York.

You can learn more about rooting all sorts of plants in Clark’s hands-on class on basic propagation to be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19 at the Botanical Gardens, 2655 South Park Avenue, Buffalo. The cost is $20 for Botanical Garden members and $25 for non-members.

And check out these other videos with Clark:

112 Comments on “Grow rose bush from wedding bouquet– or use any roses you get from the florist

  1. Hello David first off I would like to say I love your name.my husband now passed had that wonderful name.I love the video I will try it my son gave me Beautiful orange roses for Valentine’s day.something my husband did ever year. So I sure do hope this will work. I will let you know my progress.thank you again.love is so much in my Heart.thank you thank you .

  2. Hello Victoria!
    Thank you so much for your kind words, and my condolences for the passing of your husband.
    The biblical name “David” means “Well-beloved”, “Dear”,; and in Welch (which I have that heritage)…”Friend” and also the patron Saint of Wales… I am sure your husband was all of these!
    A bit of flower lore on Orange roses: Orange roses can be used to express intense desire, pride and fervor. They also convey a sense of fascination. These flowers rival only the red roses as messengers of passion in romance… no wonder why your husband chose these for Valentine’s Day, and I am hoping your Son will continue the thoughtful tradition – my Momma also loves orange roses!
    Do keep me posted on your progress!, and many thanks for your comment.
    Warm regards,
    David Clark

  3. Hello,
    This video was very helpful and easy to understand.
    I followed the instructions and have four rose plants growing. I started the plants six days ago and one of them has a bud already.

    Should I leave the bud alone?
    I’m just unsure what to do.

    Thanks so much for your help!

  4. Hello Christina!
    Congratulations on your success!
    At this point in time, I would leave the buds alone and let the root initiation process complete.
    Do keep me posted on your progress!
    Regards,
    David

  5. You do not say what to do with the stem cutting for the 6-8 weeks that it is in the plastic while waiting for it to root. How often does it need watering? How often do you mist? What type of sun does it get? What temperature? Thank you!

  6. David, I grow mostly antiques and have been propagating from cuttings for a long time but simply could not get one particular modern to root. One of my rose rustler pals told me it was because the South American grower treated the buds with a chemical to prevent me from doing just that! Rats. I found this video while searching for the name of that chemical – do you know it?

    I know we aren’t supposed to clone patented roses but I am unable to buy the bush in the USA (I tried) and I don’t want to sell it, I just want to grow a bush on my patio. So thanks, and I’ll give your method a try.

  7. I have two large rose bushes from last year. Will I cut just a stem or cut into the root to create more bushes?

  8. I was thrilled when my bouquet began to sprout and have actual buds on it. I followed all instructions, but unfortunately when taken outside, they gradually died. I wish I had just put them on patio with minimal sun, in Miami, it just didn’t work.

  9. Hello Sharon Price!
    The important part of the rooting process is to keep the humidity high inside the rooting bag, as the cutting has no roots of it’s own. It does/should have leaves on it for photosynthesis, although the green stem will photosynthesize and create food for the cutting. Sunlight should be bright, but not direct. Temperature is best at 72°F-75°F – bottom heat preferred. Rooting should take place in 6-8 weeks. It is good to gradually open the plastic bag once new growth is visible at the leaf nodes to allow CO2 and O2 gas exchange.
    I hope this is helpful!
    Regards,
    David Clark, CNLP

  10. Hello Kristi!
    I would not cut into the root area of your rose plant for propagation as most modern Hybrids are grafted plants. The scion (the top part of the plant that exhibits desirable traits) are bud grafted on the rootstock (the underground portion that lends vigorous root growth) the to scion. Cutting into the root stock will yield you an wildy-growing rose, with flowers unlike to top portion.
    For more information on rootstock for roses, read this article:
    http://scvrs.homestead.com/rootstock.html
    Therefore, I would stick to rooting the top-plant stems.
    I hope I suplied you with the information you are looking for!
    Regards,
    David Clark, CNLP

  11. Hello Kristi!
    I would not cut into the root area of your rose plant for propagation as most modern Hybrids are grafted plants. The scion (the top part of the plant that exhibits desirable traits) are bud grafted on the rootstock (the underground portion that lends vigorous root growth) the to scion. Cutting into the root stock will yield you an wildy-growing rose, with flowers unlike to top portion.
    For more information on rootstock for roses, read this article:
    http://scvrs.homestead.com/rootstock.html
    Therefore, I would stick to rooting the top-plant stems.
    I hope I supplied you with the information you are looking for!
    Regards,
    David Clark, CNLP

  12. Hello Joyce!
    Yes, I understand your frustration with the demise of your plant! Rooted cuttings should gradually be hardened off (acclimatized to outdoor conditions) over a period of a week or two, The best way to do this is to open the bag covering your rooting chamber, and place it outdoors in a shaded position, perhaps under a leafy shrub. Make sure to monitor the container for moisture, as you do not want it to dry out. Once your cuttings are exhibiting good growth, you may them plant them in the ground observing regular rose planting instructions,
    I hope I supplied you with the information you are looking for!
    Regards,
    David Clark, CNLP

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